Nutritional Supplements for your Pet

Nutritional Supplements for your Pet

Even if you feed your pet a “high-quality kibble”, that by itself can be harmful to them over their lifespan. Kibble is too dry, too processed and contains too many chemicals in which contributes to chronic diseases. Good health is created primarily by eating wholesome food; this helps explain why so many of us are in such poor health (animals and humans alike).
Dogs can benefit from many of the same nutritional supplements that you and I take; vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, amino acids and digestive enzymes.

Before 1990, vitamins and minerals were viewed with a narrow eye by the medical field as vital elements in food that prevented certain nutritional-deficiency diseases. The mainstream attitude about supplements was that they were unnecessary and a waste of money because a balanced diet could provide you with everything the body needed nutritionally. The major problem with this way of thinking was that people were eating anything but a balanced and nutritious diet. In addition, our food is also grown on degraded soil from years of intense commercial farming and agrochemicals.

More studies now show that individual nutrients at supplemental doses higher than those usually present in the diet can have a profound preventative and therapeutic impact on heart disease, liver disease, cancer, and many other serious illnesses. Research has shown that adding supplements to the diet (Vitamin E for example) blocks arterial plaque from forming and strengthens the immune system function. It was first discovered that Vitamin E helped ailing hearts when research validated the clinical observations of Canadian physicians Wilfrid (breeder of Doberman Pinschers) and Evan Shute. Their persistent reporting of positive and dramatic results with patients even though the medical community rejected the Shute brothers, led to the popularity of Vitamin E today. Many holistic veterinarians are now following in their steps.

Ideally pets should get all the nutrients they require in their food, but standard sources are highly questionable, leaving the end products usually low in freshness and high in chemicals and additives. The pet food industry generally puts forward nutritional levels in their products that are minimum amounts intended to maintain adequate health. Today the additions of contaminated environment combined with chemical additives in many commercial pet foods diminish the likelihood that minimum nutrition will maintain good health.
The more animals are removed from good, homemade natural diets, the more they need supplementation. However, even with home cooking or high-quality commercial food, our pets can thrive with the addition of certain supplements; you can always better their health! Veterinarians report shaggy hair coats become lustrous; the vitality of the pet increases.

It is recommended giving your dog a good pet vitamin/mineral supplement and a digestive enzyme before a meal because it helps ensure that all the nutrients the dog needs are there and well absorbed. You can use supplements to complete and improve the overall health of your pet.
The diet should be improved before adding supplements to your dog’s diet because it is not a replacement.

You should look for a supplement containing a wide variety of minerals, such as seabed or marine-type mineral compounds because these are often missing from the diet.

What supplements should you use? There is so many in today’s market, and trying to find the right one can be confusing. It is recommended to work with a nutritional practitioner as a supplemental program should be based on the individual health status, diet, age, and stress level of your pet; also different medical conditions. Furthermore, certain dog breeds require extra nutritional needs as well.

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Featured Photo: Riggs’ Vitamins and Supplements we use at home.

Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs, Pet Professional, Canine Nutritionist.

Happy 10th Anniversary, Mutt Makeovers!

AUGUST 8th MARKS MUTT MAKEOVERS’ 10TH ANNIVERSARY of Registered Trade and a huge thank you to the hundreds of clients who have chosen Mutt Makeovers for their professional pet services. We can’t thank you enough. This means you have taken the time to research whether it is Google, Facebook, or word of mouth to find your pet professional. Furthermore, you picked up that phone to make an appointment, entrusting me with your beloved pet. Additionally, you were happy enough to return again and again. Some of which I have been grooming for many years. I have created strong bonds with each of you.

To date, over 600 clients in Huron County, 324 in Woodstock, with repeats totaling over 5835 grooms! (Yes, I keep good records!)

I make sure I keep up with all of the current techniques, trends and safety issues to provide my clients with the best possible service as continuing education is very important not only to me, but in the grooming industry. As many years as I have been in the pet industry, you never stop learning. If you stop learning, then you can never improve. There are always videos, seminars, school, expos/trade shows and other professionals to learn from. Above all, there is life experience.

Having that said, skills used in the shop are advanced and will continue to be cutting edge with the newest dexterities to always serve you higher.

While there seems to be an ever growing industry in pet grooming, experience and knowledge is key, and I assure you won’t receive the proficiency and qualifications Mutt Makeovers holds from just any other groomer.

Again, we thank you from the bottom of our heart for being with us through our journey of TEN years!

-Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals

Mutt Makeovers has reached 600+ Clients!

Mutt Makeovers has reached 600+ Clients!

To Date: Mutt Makeovers has reached 600+ clients! (With over 5835 returning grooms!) New clients welcome, space permitting. Thank you everyone for your continuing loyalty and support!

 

 

Sheepie Snack Sunday – The Foundation of Good Health is Diet.

The foundation of good health is diet.

The saying goes, “you are what you eat,” …and digest. This holds true for our pets as well. The foundation of good health is diet, as it is the basis for our pet’s health and treating any condition, as many holistic veterinarians believe this to be true. I whole heartedly agree as I am living proof and have much experience with unbelievable  results with my own dog. Everything else that can be done for an animal can be built upon this foundation.

How does your pet’s diet balance? Are you doing enough? Could you do better? I believe we can always do better.

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs, Pet Professional, Canine Nutritionist.

More to come later on Riggs’ journey to his rare diagnosis and how we “turned him around” with our home prepared meals.

Closed Civic Holiday Monday

We will be closed to observe the Civic Holiday Monday. Enjoy the long weekend, everyone! Stay safe, and have fun!

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

Pet Professional

Welcome New Fuzzy Faces!

We have many new fuzzy faces to welcome at Mutt Makeovers! #594 Remmy, #595 B2, #596 Fleury #597 Hank, #598 Beau & #599 Toby. (With over 5815 returning grooms!) New clients welcome, space permitting. Also a huge thank you to everyone for your continuing loyalty and support!

Sheepie Snack Sunday – How Long Does a Bag of Food Stay Open?

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Typically, how long does a bag of dried food sit around before it is consumed?

A bag of dried food sits around for typically thirty nine days before it is consumed.

Why is this a problem?

This is a very lengthy shelf time and can even be combined with often poor storage conditions, leading to oxidation of fats, infestation by molds, mites and other food spoilers, and nutrient degradation. The cancer rate is high in our pets (one in three dogs will die of cancer), and it is said that improper storage at home is a contributing factor.

Dry bags of open dog food stored for 39 days (or more!) in warm, humid areas such as a kitchen, promotes the growth of molds. The waste products of these molds (called mycotoxins) are increasingly being concerned with health problems and long-term causes of cancer in humans, poultry, pigs, and other animals. Our canine companions are particularly vulnerable to these mycotoxins.

When dry dog foods absorb moisture from the air, the antimicrobials used by the manufacturers in order to delay mold growth can become overwhelmed, and mold can grow. The most common mold to consume kibble include Aspergillus flavus mold, which produces Aflatoxin B1. This is the most potent naturally occurring carcinogenic substance known. Humans cannot see low levels of mold with their naked eye. Most dogs cannot taste mold. Some dogs have died shortly after eating mycotoxin-contaminated foods, however mycotoxins kill most dogs slowly by suppressing the immune system which in turn creates long-term health issues in all organs of the body.

Storing bags of dog food for lengthy periods of time, while waiting for consumption, also poses the risk for infestation of bugs, storage mites, mice, and other intruders that thrive well on dry kibble. Storage mites may infest grains, particularly the grains used in low quality, cheaper dry dog foods. According to recent research, dogs prone to allergies are more likely to have frequent reactions to the carcasses of storage mites.

Find out strategies to enhance storage life of dry food in upcoming blogs.

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs, Pet Professional, Canine Nutritionist.

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Peroxidation (What Happens When a Bag of Kibble is Opened)

What Happens When a Bag of Kibble is Opened

As soon as a bag of kibble is opened, it allows for oxygen to enter the bag. The fats contained in the dog foods undergo peroxidation, meaning the fats turn rancid.

Packaging of dog food has advanced but has not eliminated the amount of oxygen that is transmitted in unopened bags of dog food. Once the bags are opened, that air rushes in and accelerates the oxidation of the fats; even more so every time you dip your hand in to feed your dog, if you don’t zip your bag up, or if you empty your bag out into a storage bin and improper storage techniques. Dog food companies also use antioxidants such as vitamin E and other natural sources to hinder the oxidation process, but over time with recurrent exposure to oxygen the antioxidants are eventually all oxidized (used up) and the fats –starting with the omega-3s being more fragile, begin turning rancid.

So why does it matter if the fats turn rancid in your pet’s food? When a fatty acid becomes rancid, the shape, function, activity and structure of the fatty acid are profoundly altered. Rancid fats reduce the nutritive value of the protein, degrade antioxidants and vitamins, and can cause liver and heart problems, diarrhea, macular degeneration, cancer, arthritis, cell damage, and death.

How can you avoid feeding rancid fats to your pet? For dry and frozen food feeders, feed a properly stored, recently made basic food without added fish oils or EPA and DHA to ensure the proper balance of fats to avoid this problem. Instead, add the fragile fats yourself contained in fresh, highly practical non-rancid, natural forms much better than any bag of dog food.

Find all of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs, Pet Professional, Canine Nutritionist.

NEXT:

*What happens to dog food that is left uneaten within a lengthy shelf time? *Typically How long does a bag of dried food sit around before consumption?

 

 

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Frozen Banana Treats Recipe

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Frozen Banana Treats Recipe (THDC)

Frozen treats are a wonderful way to keep dogs cool in the summer. These treats can also be used to soothe teething puppies. The mixture can also be frozen into stuffable chew toys if you seal the tip with a tab of peanut butter first. Bananas are a great source of potassium, and yogurt makes these treats a healthy combination.

Preparation Time: 5 minutes      Makes: about 16 treats

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups (32 fl oz/900ml) plain, whole milk yogurt
  • 2 tbsp peanut butter
  • 3 ripe bananas, peeled and mashed

Directions:

  1. Blend all the ingredients to a puree in a food processor
  2. Pour into 4-oz/115-g plastic cups
  3. Freeze until firm
  4. Pop the treat out of the cup and watch your pet enjoy!

Note: Store the treats in the freezer for up to 2 weeks.

 

Nutritional Information:

Calories:               71

Protein:                  3g

Carbohydrates: 8.5g

Dietary Fibre:     0.7g

Fat:                        3.1g

Enjoy!

Find all our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs, Pet Professional, Canine Nutritionist.

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Fruity Pops Recipe

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Fruity Pops Recipe (The Healthy Dog Cookbook)

Dogs love  ice cubes – they’re cool and crunchy, perfect for a hot summer’s day; a fun way to cool off. These treats make rewards healthy and delicious! They are also wonderful for teething puppies. The fruity pops can also be frozen into stuffable chew toys if you seal the tip with a tab of peanut butter first.

Preparation Time: 5 minutes (Makes 24 ice Cubes)

Ingredients:

  • 1 qt/1.13 litres fruit juice (NOT grape juice)
  • 1 ripe banana, mashed
  • ½ cup (4 fl oz/125 ml) plain, whole milk yogurt

Directions:

  1. Blend the fruit juice with the mashed banana and mix in the yogurt.
  2. Pour into ice cube trays and put into the freezer.
  3. When frozen, pop out of tray and serve one at a time.

Note: Pops will keep for up to 1 month in the freezer.

Nutritional Information Per Cube:

Protein:                0.2g

Dietary Fibre:     0.1g

Fat:                        0.2g

Carbohydrates: 7.2g

Calories:               31

Enjoy!

Find all our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly, Danielle & Riggs, Pet Professional, Canine Nutritionist.