Sheepie Snack Sunday – Taste Enhancers

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Taste Enhancers

One thing I hear repeatedly in my shop is “but my dog loves it!” One, of course he does, he’s a dog. But more importantly, an institute report describes pet food manufacturers as “masters” in the art of taste enhancement. This means that they can get animals to eat something “they would normally turn up their noses at.”

In order to do this, they spray kibble with discarded restaurant grease that has been stabilized with potent chemical antioxidants.

“Pet food scientists have discovered that animals love the taste of these sprayed fats,” from the report. The manufacturers want a food that your pet will eat enthusiastically, even become addicted to.

Their goal is that you become a returning customer to their product. It is extremely paramount that the pet food industry is for taste appeal, not quality.

Other chemicals are used in order to increase the palatability, extend the extreme shelf life, and advance the appearance so the product will look appealing to eat (but most importantly, will look good enough and cutesy for you to buy). The pet food manufacturing development includes some of the major names in chemical colouring, in which some of these dyes can actually make vulnerable animals hyperactive. They even may add sodium nitrite to actually prevent fading of colours. Red Dye#40 is used in some kibbles in order to create the appearance of a “fresh, meaty look” (only for your eye, your dog won’t even notice) and as result, both these agents have been long related to cancer and birth defects in laboratory animals. They are even banned in some countries.

The list goes on. In addition to create more appeal, further chemicals include anticaking, antimicrobial, coloring, firming, flavoring, drying, pH control, and surface finishing agents, and emulsifiers, sequestrants, synergists, texturizers, lubricants, and sweeteners (Zucker).

The pet food industry is an unregulated mess that gets away with so much. This is just the scratch of the service about what is in your pet’s food.

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can also be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

What’s New Pussy Cat?

We all want one thing for our pets, and that’s for them to live long, healthy lives.

It’s back at the books for me, and much earlier than I had planned! I have been once again accepted, currently enrolled and started my studies in the Feline Nutrition Program at the Academy of Natural Health Sciences in the U.S. (Yes, I am still grooming for you fulltime as well!) It is a little difficult to turn my brain from canine to feline I must admit. As you may know, I am very passionate about nutrition, and this is my second full program towards achieving my CPN diploma. I hope to offer complete counselling sessions in the future when I discovered this is something our area lacks.

“ The first commandment of better health is to feed your cat a better diet.” Zucker

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

 

Featured Photo My Marlie Cat (Marlana) lived to be over 20 years old.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Happy Thanksgiving!

Mutt Makeovers would like to wish everyone a safe and Happy Thanksgiving!

Please see this week’s Sheepie Snack Sunday Thanksgiving edition about safety tips regarding your pet when it comes to Turkey.

We will also be closed Monday to observe this holiday. See you all back in the shop Tuesday!

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Thanksgiving Turkey Edition

Happy Thanksgiving, everyone! While it may be extremely tempting to share scraps with your pet this holiday we want to make sure you do it in a safe manner to keep everyone from an emergency vet visit.

Many people save the leftovers such as skins, gravy/juices, all in which are extremely high in fat and dangerous for your pet. An overload of fat can cause acute pancreatitis and inflammation.

Also avoid feeding the bones as bones can splinter, puncturing the digestive tract. They can cause choking and blockages that can require emergency surgery to remove the bone. So keep those out of reach for the safety of your pet.

 

Here’s how to incorporate a turkey into your dog’s diet:

    • Turkey Breast: Remove the skin
      • Turkey breast is 45% lower in fat than chicken breast
    • Turkey thighs (again without the skin) lower in fat and higher in protein than skinless chicken thighs, with 10 percent fewer calories overall
  • 85% lean ground turkey: this is a great mixture for mixing with starchy vegetables or grain
  • 90% lean ground turkey: if you’re avoiding carbs for your dog (dieting) 90% lean provides a great balance of fat and protein.

 

TIP: When buying ground turkey if the fat percentage is not clearly labeled, leave it on the shelf. Often rolls may look like a wonderful deal but if they are loaded with greater than 15% fat, forget it.

 

Turkey & Veggie Simmer Recipe (R. Woodford)

A low-calorie, low-carbohydrate vegetable recipe with a wide assortment of antioxidants.

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ pounds 85% lean ground turkey
  • 1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger
  • 1 cup chopped kale
  • 1 cup chopped green beans
  • 1 cup seeded and chopped red bell pepper
  • 1 cup water

Directions:

  1. Combine the turkey and ginger in a large skillet and cook over medium heat until lightly browned, about 5 minutes.
  2. Stir the vegetables and water into the turkey mixture. When the water begins to simmer, lower the heat to low and cook for 15 minutes, until the vegetables are softened.

 

YIELD: 6 Cups

 

KEY NUTRIENTS:

 

197 calories per cup

Proteins: 416%

Carbohydrates-to-protein ratio 0.2 to 1 (you many reverse this ratio)

Total fats 288%

Antioxidants 137%

 

Serve the following amount as a meal twice a day (omit your kibble to compensate to not overfeed):

10lbs dog: 2/3 to 1 cup

20lbs dog: 1 to 1 2/3 cups

40lbs dog: 2 to 2 3/4 cups

60lbs dog: 2 1/3 to 3 2/3 cups

80lbs dog: 3 to 4 ½ cups

100lbs dog: 3 1/3 to 5 1/3 cups

Enjoy!

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

September is Pain Awareness Month – Sheepie Snack Sunday Arthritis Recipe Edition

September is Pain Awareness Month – Sheepie Snack Sunday Arthritis Edition

We hope that our dogs will live long lives. As we see them age, the prevalence of arthritis increases. However, age is not a disease, but arthritis is.

Osteoarthritis is a condition in which the cartilage slowly degenerates. Joints become increasingly stiff and may lose their range of motion. Some causes of osteoarthritis are excessive exercise and obesity that can put your dog at risk.

In addition, inflammation known as rheumatoid arthritis involves putting the immune system in overdrive in which it attacks the joints, tissues and organs.

Prostaglandins are fatty acids that act like hormones. They are responsible for many functions in the body such as increasing or decreasing inflammation. The total amount and composition of carbohydrates, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, fats, and anti-inflammatory compounds in food establish whether there will be an overload of inflammatory prostaglandins in the body.

If a pet owner creates a diet that balances inflammatory and anti-inflammatory foods (list provided with consultation or seek your veterinarian), one can reduce the amount of detrimental prostaglandins, or at least not do any more damage by increasing prostaglandins. I recommend feeding a high quality food without chemicals and preservatives that can stress the digestive tract. Toxins produced by intestinal disorders and poor liver function can often cause disruption of normal processes that may lead to inflammation in the joints. Digestive enzymes along with a probiotic supplement with beneficial bacteria can help aid in restoring normalcy and health in your pet’s gut.

A better diet with less protein is the first step since Arthritis has an immune component to it. Many commercial diets contain poor-quality proteins which challenge the immune system daily.

I chose the following recipe as I felt it is easy, and many still prefer the grain-free options as their pets are not used to fresh foods and have many sensitivities. It also includes ginger which aids in aching joints.

Arthritis-Relieving Beef And Sweet Potato (R. Woodford)

Ingredients:

  • 2lbs Ground Beef (85% lean)
  • 5oz frozen spinach, thawed
  • 1 ½ cups water
  • 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 3lbs sweet potatoes, cleaned and cut into 1 inch cubes
  • 3 tablespoons salmon oil
  • ¼ cup chopped fresh parsley
  • 3,000 mg glucosamine tablets with chondroitin, crushed or pulsed in a food processor (perhaps see your vet about supplementation first)

Directions:

  • In a large skillet over medium heat, cook the beef for 6 minutes. Add the spinach, ½ cup of the water, and ginger and cook for 6 minutes longer, stirring occasionally to break up the beef.
  • Remove from the heat and allow the beef mixture to cool.
  • Combine the sweet potatoes and the remaining 1 cup of water in a microwave-safe dish and cook on high power for 7 minutes. Stir the potatoes and cook on high for an additional 7 minutes.
  • Allow the potato mixture to cool, and then combine it with the beef mixture, salmon oil, parsley, and glucosamine supplement in a large bowl.

Yield: 12 cups; 295 calories per cup

Portions: Daily

Divide into two meals, or serve one-half the daily portion per day with one-half the normal amount of dry food.

  • 10 pound Dog: 2/3 – 1 ¼ cups
  • 20 pound Dog: 1 ½ – 2 cups
  • 40 pound Dog: 2 2/3 to 3 ½ cups
  • 60 pound Dog: 3 ½ to 4 ½ cups
  • 80 pound Dog: 4 ½ to 5 2/3 cups

Enjoy!

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Turmeric

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Turmeric

In keeping with September being Pain Awareness Month, today’s Sheepie Snack Sunday is Turmeric. Turmeric is an amazing Indian spice to keep in your cupboard. It acts as a strong anti-inflammatory in the body, making it great for those with arthritis. Containing curcumin, it also helps in aiding boost the immune system as it has antioxidants properties.

Turmeric is known to have several benefits from starting at the tip of your dog’s ears eliminating ear infections, preventing cataracts, improving neurological function, lowers the risk of heart disease, detoxifies and improves live function, regulates stomach acid, promotes healthy digestion and relieves gastrointestinal disorders.

By adding a small grind of black pepper, the piperine in the pepper increases the effectiveness of turmeric by 2,000 percent (R. Woodford). Feeding turmeric with coconut oil allows for even better absorption.

Turmeric is available in health food stores, most super markets, and for sure at any Indian stores.

Small dogs: Grate ¼ – ½ teaspoon to any meal

Giant breeds can take up to 1 teaspoon BID.

Turmeric can be mixed into the food. Make sure you start low and increase gradually.

 

Enjoy!

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

September is Animal Pain Awareness Month

September is Animal Pain Awareness Month

What if you were in pain but you couldn’t tell anybody? Nobody noticed, or nobody did anything to help you?

“My owners think I’m just getting old.” “The kids think I am no fun anymore.” “The whipper snapper pup I live with thinks I’m grumpy” “I wish someone would listen… why can’t they see that I walk slowly because I’m in pain? Why can’t they see that I don’t play because it hurts? Why doesn’t the pup understand that jumping on me makes my back hurt?” – Canine Arthritis Management.

According to the International Veterinary Academy of Pain Management (IVAPM), September has been chosen as Animal Pain Awareness Month to correspond with human medicine’s Pain Awareness Month.

IVAPM encourages a variety of organizations (such as veterinarians, technicians, clinics in the veterinary industry, and educators) to raise public awareness about pain and pain management as it pertains to veterinary patients during this annual campaign through education and advocacy.

If something is considered to cause pain in us humans, chances are it will likely generate pain in animals too. IVAPM anticipates encouraging pet parents to take an active responsibility in recognizing the signs and symptoms of pain in animals and seeking veterinary care.

There are many different forms when it comes to pain and your pet: surgical pain, diseases such as arthritis and cancer. Acute pain in your pet is a noticeable and distressing pain. Chronic pain can be more subtle, or masked sometimes as “getting old or slowing down”.

“Old age is not a disease, but pain is.”

Pain can be treated and managed in animals; it is about finding the right option for your pet. There are many treatments available including pain medications, chiropractor, physical rehabilitation, acupuncture, and massage.

Recognize the Common Signs of Pain in Your Pet: Dogs

(listed by the ivapm.org)

  • Decreased social interaction
  • Anxious expression
  • Submissive behavior
  • Refusal to move
  • Whimpering
  • Howling
  • Growling
  • Guarding behavior
  • Aggression; biting
  • Decreased appetite
  • Self-mutilation (chewing)
  • Changes in posture

 

  • Recognize the Common Signs of Pain in Your Pet: Cats 
  • Reduced activity
  • Loss of appetite
  • Quiet/loss of curiosity
  • Changes in urinary/defecation habits
  • Hiding
  • Hissing or spitting
  • Lack of agility/jumping
  • Excessive licking/grooming
  • Stiff posture/gait
  • Guarding behavior
  • Stops grooming/matted fur
  • Tail flicking
  • Weight loss

Mutt Makeovers values humanity before vanity and recognizes when an animal needs veterinary assistance.

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

 

Sheepie Snack Sunday – Butternut Squash

Sheepie Snack Sunday: Butternut Squash

Butternut squash is very nutritional as it is filled with many different vitamins, minerals, fibre and carotenoids that are all beneficial in protecting the health of the eyes and heart. I was a plain gal until I met my husband and fell in love with squash! It wasn’t until we had a tasting for our wedding that I tried butternut squash soup that I absolutely fell in love with the taste of it. Apparently they are very hard to peel, I will leave that to the husband, the head chef of our house, but the skin is actually edible for your canine companion (and us), just make sure you buy organic when feeding the skins to avoid any chemicals.

To make life easier when cutting up a butternut squash, use a heavy sharp knife, cutting off the stem, then cut off the bulbous part. Put the portion of the seeds aside. Carefully slice off the skin while you stand the straight piece on its bottom end, rotating it around until all of it is skinned. After you have skinned the squash, you can slice, shred, or cube into pieces and feed to your dog (raw or in your favourite recipe).

Butter’ In The Bowl Recipe

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees F
  2. Scoop the seeds out of the bulb end and cut into eight to ten wedges
  3. Chop the wedges and skin into bite-size bits, and then spread in a lightly oiled baking dish.
  4. Bake for 25 minutes.

Key Nutrients:

Calories 4%

Protein 3%

Total fats 1%

Carbohydrates 16g

Magnesium 16%

Potassium 24%

A607%

B3(Niacin) 20%

B6(pyridoxine) 30%

B9 (folate) 29%

E 14%

Antioxidants 6%

 

1 cup of Butternut squash equals 63 calories; equivalent to approximately 3 tablespoons of commercial dry food. Adjust your kibble to the following:

10lbs Dog: ¼ cup, diced

20lbs Dog: 1/3 cup, diced

40lbs Dog: 2/3, cup, diced

60lbs Dog: ¾ cup, diced

80lbs Dog: 1 cup, diced

100lbs Dog: ¼ cups, diced.

 

Enjoy!

All of our Sheepie Snack Sunday blogs & recipes can be found on our Facebook page in our album here.

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

 

 

 

 

Recipe reference R. Woodford.

 

 

 

 

RESPONSIBLE DOG OWNERSHIP DAY

Sept. 15, 2018: Responsible Dog Ownership Day

RESPONSIBLE DOG OWNERSHIP DAY

Responsible Dog Ownership Day is observed annually on the third Saturday in September. Today, September 15, 2018 we take this day to encourage pet owners to make a promise to your canine companion to provide them with the unwritten, unspoken contract to keep them happy, healthy and safe in return for their companionship and unconditional love.

On the 119th anniversary of the AKC, the American Kennel Club promoted Responsible Dog Ownership Days yearly, beginning September 17, 2003. Responsible Dog Ownership Day has since been encouraging dog owners to be the most respectful and responsible cohort to their canine they can possibly be.

Unfortunately many do not take into consideration all the care and responsibility that is involved when taking on such a loyal friend. All too often it is seen that dogs are being rehomed due to no fault of their own, whether it be their size, temperament, energy, time, veterinary costs; these are all the responsibility of the dog’s owner. One should not get a dog if they are not willing to put in the appropriate training, socialization, and brain stimulation that a dog requires. Often people give up on a new dog when it chews or wrecks the house or goes potty indoors and they are frustrated because it is harder than they thought it would be. Dogs are rehomed frequently when a new baby arrives, or when children lose interest. Many of our companions are denied basic veterinary care because people cannot, do not, or will not afford to put the finances into the basic medical care the pet deserves. Many people also give up on their dog when they have to move, or have a job change. Dogs are forever – they are not disposable!

With more than 5,000 affiliated dog clubs, along with other pet-related organizations, the AKC invites these dog enthusiasts to host Responsible Dog Ownership Days to help educate the public in their areas about the responsibilities of dog ownership, as well as help existing owners improve their relationships with their pets. These events include of educational booths, microchipping, performance dog demonstrations, games and activities to try out with your own dog, health clinics and more.  Owning a dog has endless joys and happiness, just as they give us, but sometimes we all need a gentle reminder about the responsibility we have to our pets in return.

#ResponsibleDogOwnershipDay

Making the fur fly,

Danielle & Riggs

The Pet Professionals: Cert. Vet Assist, Professional Dog Groomer, Canine Nutritionist.

Welcome!

Mutt Makeovers would like to welcome our new four-legged guests this week. #606 Prince, #607 Tiny and #608 Presley. Also a huge thank you and appreciation to our returning fuzzy faces!